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later about education, higher education is often the first thing on the menu to cut in many states because young people don't vote in as great a number. that needs to be clearer and more boldly stated by the candidates. >> it's an interesting point. if i'm tutoring at the neighborhood school, i get the instant gratification. if i vote for a candidate, the candidate is a messy sort of things. it also feels to me, ben, part of what that distinction is between charity and justice. charity feels good but justice takes a long time. i hate to do the, oh, young people need to cultivate patience thing, but it does feel a little like that sense. >> look at our culture. we have the high speed internet, fast food. meanwhile you have a gridlocked congress where very little, if not anything is getting done. i think this was the least productive congress ever. >> on purpose. >> reconciling those two forces at odds is difficult for those people. >> we'll come right back to you, valerie and felicia. when we come back, young voters out there, if you're listening, president obama really does have a
's. rather than just putting one person on education to try to gobble that entire fire hose that comes at them, they can add narratives and subtract them, make sure people are involved. if they are not enrolled in those narratives, something will play out without their impact. >> a follow-up question -- i am not thinking of any city in particular here. with that kind of operation, let's say you have that operation in a city where the daily newspaper in town started to do some very strange things. i imagine that. it was owned by somebody who was very openly talking they were going to support particular causes, particular developments, particular parties. i imagine something like that could happen. does that add to the obligation of citizens, people like you, to do more to fill that void? or can you still fill the void -- is that city just out of luck? >> first of all, it is a remarkable symbol of what is happening to journalism. locally, the owners of the "union tribune" just purchased the "north county times" -- the assets are collapsing in value. they bought it for $12 million, sold h
levees. i kept thinking, the category 5 levees we need are shelter and quality education and health care for everybody and infrastructure and transportation so that people can move on. is there any possibility of taking that and making it a broader conversation, environmental policy or housing policy that makes it easier to manage this? >> i think there is. i agree with neera that people like this post-partisan moment. they are tired of partisan politics and nothing getting done. we need it all. we need education and infrastructure. bloomberg endorsed obama citing global warming as the cause. twice in the last 14 months, new york city has had to evacuate. that has never happened before in the city's history. all these things are in play. this has changed the dynamic. there is a sense we need to move on this. i wish we could have bipartisan agreement on how to move forward. >> it is tough to have bipartisan agreement when republicans keep being climate change designers and anti-science in a variety of ways. >> anti-science, we are still dealing with 46 million people on food stamps. we ar
has got better jobs plan, and better record, and a better budget plan, a better education plan, at a better health care plan than governor romney. if you listen to all the debates, the republican arguments come down to the. -- to this. we left him a terrible mess and in 4 years he did not fix it. we have finally discovered that middle-class people are having a hard time. put us back again. we will do the same thing we did before. that is basically the argument. look at this. i hope i have earned some credibility with you. [cheers and applause] on jobs and budgets. do you believe our country works better when we are all together or when your on your own? do you believe our economy works better when we share prosperity in response ability or whether we just keep the money at the top and help it trickles down? -- hope it trickles down? do you believe our policies are better when we make them based on evidence or extremist ideology? do you believe our budget are better women for them based on an arithmetic or illusion? barack obama as a senator ran for president for nearly two year
challenges of the week. i'm honored to be here, your appreciation for the penn state and higher education. we need your continued engagement. again, thank you for joining us. thank you for bringing along the penn state cookies. [laughter] according to google news, there's over 45,000 stories about penn state and sandusky. you've written them. you've read them. i imagine that most of you have formed an opinion about penn state and our actions over the last year. beyond the headlines, there's another reality, one that exists for penn state's 96,000 students, 44,000 full and part-time faculty and staff, and over 550,000 living alumni. it's a world of teaching, research, and service. it's a world with an $800 million research program, hundreds of degrees offered, 24 campuses, online world campus, academic health center, a law school, and 157 years of tradition. it's also a world that has continued to face ongoing controversies surrounding jerry sandusky, our board of trustees, current and former administrators, and me. the legal process continues to unfold as evidence by the attorney generals fur
have lots of water. there is any number of issues, whether it is around energy or education. this strikes me as a way to get around the challenge of government is dysfunctional and compartmentalize. you have a lot here. it seems like this might be part of the solution. >> before i comment about that, i want to be sure that we do not forget those have been unemployed so long they are out of the workforce. real question will skill readiness. i do not want to forget them in the equation. it is music my ears to hear the definition of the problem and information. it is music to my ears to hear that. we have a piecemeal approach of a couple of initiatives. they're really attract well to analyze and a city that is depopulating. you're trying to talk about redefining wealth. i think of the outbidding the police cars with the cameras, everybody has done that i think. both of those were seeded with grant money. when the grant ran out, we have not been able to keep up. there needs to be that money, whether it be federal or state. there needs to be this institutional approach that redef
legitimate and getting an education and making sure that your relationships, people were legitimately married. anything that pointed back words or made you illegitimate was not really something they wanted to talk about and have out there. it is too bad because it closed a lot of doors in our family and that is what you found in michele obama's family. very fortunate, you were able to help and truly open those doors for her family. >> at least with been -- within her family, there are those conversations happening. as i said americans, ordinary americans across the country are making these discoveries with dna testing so these conversations are happening around the country. when you talk about marriage and the importance of legitimacy, one of the other stories which talks about the variations of the american experience during slavery was the first lady's family had ancestors who were freed for decades before the civil war and one of the most interesting records i came across was a record which showed those members of her family who after the civil war went to the courthouse and lined up to ge
-centric for something in the future. to me, both of those reasons focus on this time of investing in education and development of future capabilities, tactics, techniques, and procedures. we have to invest in that going forward. >> could i do a short follow-up? what does that approach imply for the army civilians and contractors? do they become diminished? >> they might in terms of numbers, but it will still play a role. >> and how do you incorporate the planning of what those numbers need to be, particularly on the contractor side? >> you want to have the right balance. again, contractors provide us with its unique capabilities that we simply do not have. that is what they will focus on. we have department of army civilians that will provide continuity and consistency that we need. then you need our military members in order to provide us with experience, expertise, and frankly sometimes, just the validity of what we are trying to do based on their experiences. that is where and try to capture the right mix. right now, it is overbalanced toward contractors and civilians. i'm trying to rebalan
. they register under the tax code 501 c 4. the organizations that are primarily about educating people about issues or policy options and things like that but they're allowed to do some political activity. it can't be the main thing they're about. but they are permitted to be in politics. and now because ofthe decisions from 2010 that are so famous they can be more specific in the way they're involved. the things that define the elections are -- because they're mainly about enl indicating people have been able to do that -- educating people and not mainly about elections, they have been able to do that without disclosing the sources of the money that they've gotten. so tense or hundreds of millions of dollars being spent without us knowing where it actually came from. host: let's go to our democrats line. caller: what i would like to say about this money, i feel like this money is basically it's generations of money which a lot of elderly white people have built up over time when the system was discriminatory. now they have come out and decided to buy an election. this money is not taxed or
. it is the highest income region. it has people with the highest educational level and the state on average. it tends to be the most democratic region. if you go down to tidewater and hampton roads, that is a heavy defense industry area. it is a white-collar and blue- collar and has a large african- american population. it also has a relatively low nativity rape, people there were not necessarily born in virginia. the navy brings in many people from across the nation and the world. the richmond area as an urban area but it is probably the most conservative urban region in this area. it might be one of the most conservative and the country. it is a traditional area particularly because the west side of richmond -- the east side is heavily african-american and the west side is predominantly white and conservative and has a high negativity rate. some of the counties have become more diverse but by and large, it is also a conservative area. you can include far southwest virginia as a world unto itself. it used to beat republican but mountain valley republican, more liberal republican and now -- and then
develop its domestic rail infrastructure and matured through training and education and managing that rail system through the creation of a career in transportation. think about growing saudi arabia and talent and not hiring saudi arabians. many are aggressive in seeking out saudi arabian students for some programs. now, as they graduate, we will bring them on for training within the company. with the intent of starting them out in entry-level managers and engineers in the kingdom. they are starting a career. not just being hired on for a job. they did all this. they beat the competition. they won. other american companies are making a significant impact. not just on their businesses, but also on the future of saudi arabia. exxon mobil has a long tradition in the kingdom. among their success is a huge refinery about two hours north of a main city. the refinery has 92% saudi arabian employees. stretching all the way from management to blue-collar employees. exxon mobil was into saudia station before saudia station was required. we anticipate this to the same degree of the new refinery that
smart guy. he is highly educated and very different from a lot of other latino politicians. he is completely american in his point of view. i think it will pass over more than a lot of other candidates. >> give me your sense of how important beyond this election this voting bloc will become. >> just democracy itself, that means the percentage of overall vote and will be hispanic will continue to grow. how will it break? i do not think it is a democrat did block. i think it is an independent bloc. i think it is winnable for both parties. i do not think immigration we will be talking about in five or 10 years. i think the party that ignores some of these basic issues, education reform is really a major civil rights issue right now. 80% of the students in los angeles public schools are hispanic, so when that system sales, los angeles fails, california fails, but latinos feel this as well. tavis: how important is it to have voices in mainstream media that get a chance to express this view? >> one would be nice. i am struggling. when you look at the sunday morning shows, they are fa
. nobody else can do this to the extent we can. we have very sharp people, well-educated, well schooled and trained particularly in the medical profession's to make a difference on things. and we have this ongoing research and development as background to make us all better at doing these things. so, these are the basics, and one of the things we would like to draw out today is what else is there that we should understand, what else can we do, how can we take these attributes and capabilities and maybe make them better? i won't want to monopolize all the time, but i would like to throw my desire on the table, and that is it's been a great honor, and i have to admit an eye opener at first to go around the world to places that are certainly less privileged than we are and to see the dedicated efforts of so many people not just from this country but many other countries who are trying to make a difference in places that need help with is a medical area or general health and welfare of people advancing their education, let in this venue the fundamental security, personal security through be
that judgment and now you have to work with that in the best way you can. >> when i did the education outreach to federal judges, that's the biggest questions. generally they want to know can you help me do any better than my best clinical judgment? yeah, we can. we can design tests that can predict and they want to know how good can you get? risk assessments are getting better. they're getting a lot better. i look at risk assessments as i have identified the variables that promote risk so that i can develop treatment strategies to reduce those risks. so if you have somebody that scores very high in psychopathy and has all of the other risk factors that would suggest they're is an 80% chance of reoffending in four or five years, you can develop a tiered or strategic relief plan that would help mitigate those risk factors so that that person can be -- levels of risk can be brought down. that's how we think about risk management. i call it typically risk needs assessment, because once you understand the risks, then you can develop ways of mediating them and whether or not that's a brain differen
old and is a pet owner may lean democrat and be susceptible to ads about education issues. thanks to these algorithms, the campaigns can categorize voters into like-minded groups and tailor their advertising directly to them. >> what this now shows is when you've done a select of voters in a particular jurisdiction, it will map out where those voters live. >> reporter: which means once the campaigns have used algorithms to decide which voters to target, they lose i have been pet-owning, wash d.c. d.c. nascar fans who care about national security, for instance, the software can lead them right to their front door. >> so a campaign can literally know who on a block-by-block basis is persuadable and only target those people. >> that's correct. reporter: but what makes this year's presidential election different is that political advertisers now have unprecedented access to your on-line browsing data and can deliver tailored ads to you online. >> so the idea here with online is that you can target people very precisely based upon their interests and based upon th the behavior. when yo
, better education plan, than his opponent, gov. romney. if you listen to all those debates -- the republican argument comes down to, we left him a terrible mess, and in four years he didn't fix it. we discovered middle class people are having a hard time. so take him out and put ius back in and we'll do what we did before on steriods. that is the argument. let's loo ak at this. i hope i've earned some credibility with you. on jobs and budgets. first thing we have to decide is, do you believe the country works better when we're all in this together or when you're on your own. do you believe the economy works better with shared responsibility or we give all the money to the top and hope it trickles down? or that our policies are better based on evidence or extremeist idiology. onwhe nwe base them oour budges illusion?tic or first of all, let's start with the facts. obama ran for president for two years, including the secretary of state and joe biden. they all thought what they were doing was offering specific solutions. to change the courst of a weak economy. before the meltd
. but other benefits are also important such as childcare, education and employment services, cash assistance, energy assistance. and others, housing and others, wic, school meals can also be included in the package. the technology that is available, the cloud, the enterprise architecture, the rules engine can unlearning all these terms, it makes it possible. it really expands the degree to which information can be shared and things can be streamlined. but the policies and procedures and how human beings interact with those systems behind the scenes and in front of the scenes, it's also very important. i do think there is a one size fits all kind of approach. the states along with local communities and the federal government with input from others need to figure out how a coherent vision to be made to package all these benefits together. right now in most states people who applied to the human services door are able to access health benefits. especially lowest income families. but there's a risk i think under health care reform that as states, states may split sort of the health, health peace
for the next four years: making education and training a national priority; building on our manufacturing boom; boosting american-made energy; reducing the deficits responsibly by cutting where... we can, and asking the wealthy to pay a little more. and ending the war in afghanistan, so we can... do some nation-building here at home. that's the right path. so read my plan, compare it to governor romney's... and decide which is better for you. it's an honor to be your president... and i'm asking for your vote... so together, we can keep moving america forward. i'm barack obama and i approve this message. >>> tracking sandy this moing. we have live pictures from rehoboth beach, already feeling the effects of this monster storm. the category 1 hurricane has its sights set on the east coast and coastal communities like rehoboth beach and many through north carolina and new jersey are bracing for impact to see where this storm might make landfall. our area may not get a direct hit from sandy but we could still feel the effects. >> many cities and counties are putting resources in place. joining us
taken jobs and they're not using their educational background or their training. the food stamp number show how tough the economy is. 17% on food stamps. i'm glad we have unemployment programs and food stamp programs and i'm glad we have a number of companies that have come to delaware. we have not done enough. we have to much burdensome regulation. we still raised taxes during this recession which we drove back. personal income tax and we need to create a stable business environment. we have not done a good enough job creating that environment and that is borne out by the numbers. >> where do you stand on your blueprint for delaware? >> we have implemented the majority of items in their and we have more to go. some of them we did not have the resources. i said we ought to create a delaware version of a cops bill. we have made progress there as well. it is not spin to the hundreds of workers were back at the refinery. it is not spin to the people who decided to expand in delaware. it is not spin to the folks at foxfire printing who are adding dozens of jobs. it is not spin to the peopl
and jobs. we have a large energy sector. education is a big issue. among the latino population and especially democrats, immigration reform. host: the demographics of the voters in colorado? guest: 52% women, 40% men. we have increased the number of people were voting by mail. 800,000 people have already cast ballots in this state. it is equally divided. one-third of the electorate is a registered republican, won third democrat, one-third unaffiliated. everyone is plan for the group of unaffiliated voters. you'll hear a lot about appealing to women and latinos. we have heard a lot about the bennett strategy and that is the strategy center michael bennett used in running against the tide in 2010. where by appealing to women and latinos he was able to pull a victory in a year or not favorable to democrats. host: where are the traditionally democratic areas of the state? guest: denver is ground zero for democrats. boulder would be another. they have large registration bases in arapahoe m jefferson county. surprisingly, the fifth biggest county for democratic voter registration is
't know -- maybe you can answer, maybe you can give me some sort of education on this. but for the most part, i mean, naturally animals in the wild do they naturally go after their own sex to reproduce? i don't think so. age sex is -- >> let me answer the caller in very direct terms. sex orientation is a characteristic of being human. i think put more simply, i was born this way no different than straight americans were born straight. one of the questions that i always like to ask people when we're having this conversation is when did you choose to be straight? people think about that for three or four seconds and they're like well i didn't choose to be straight, i was born this way. well the same applies to me. i can assure you that nothing happened. i didn't really have a conversation with myself and decide to be gay. god made me this way and i'm very proud of that. and so to the extent that we understand that the caller was born straight and i was born gay and we're able to kind of get over that understanding, then i think we come to an easy conclusion that we both deserve to be trea
, , because i might not be able to take care of you," that is important to a senior citizen. on education, people need to really dig and find out what the educational programs are all about. it is more money and more money. it is all for the unions. if there were things going on in the school that the parents could see, instead of being pushed aside because the government wants to take over the children, and not let the parents have anything to say -- there are other subjects as well as the middle-class. host: will give you a chance to respond to some of her comments. guest: i think she is right. all the voters should have an opportunity to look behind the ads and build into the research on the individual candidates. they should come out knowing this country needs a change in direction, and who will create the number of jobs that are necessary. i think governor mitt romney has that program, if you look at it in depth. his commitment to produce 12 million jobs over the next four years, the way this country has to do. also, to take regulation out of the small business community, so that our
any democratic president has done. that's a pretty big deal. and i think education reform with the grants are also really important. so he has done stuff but what is interesting to me, and i don't fully understand is, why not campaign on that? >> eliot: robert has made a point. chrystia you're right. in terms of wealth, income and. >> healthcare was a distraction because he followed hillary clinton's advice. he didn't have a single payer. he didn't have any robust public option. he did nothing to control costs nothing. >> but isn't it better than nothing? >> look, if i lived in a swing state i would vote for obama no doubt about it. romney scares me. he wants to give wall street a bank check. he is a greater evil. >> eliot: you were clear you said he's the lesser of two evils. >> obama. >> eliot: yes. you did not describe him in the affirmative vote. >> you know this better than i do. when you put lawrence sumners in and timothy geithner, you are clear about it. i would have voted for you. that's why i came on this show. seriously, you had the right mentionmessage. i'm not
a devastating effect on education in california. >> if prop 30 fails, school and colleges would face $6 billion in cuts. the trigger cuts as governor brown is calling them. small business action committee is pushing hard to defeat the msh measure saying higher taxes will drive away jobs. >> for more, we sat down with governor jerry brown at kcbs myself and our first question is, okay, look, this isn't the first time that voters in california have been asked to bail out the state budget. why isn't it fixed and why should they go for this? >> the last ten yards to go over the goal line is this money for schools. it's an either/or. on or off. either money in to schools or money out of schools. i wish it didn't have to be this way. but at the end of the day i hope people know that 99% of the people will not pay this income tax. it's only 1% and what people will pay is a penny when they get a $400 cappucino or a sandwich. a penny. if you buy $8 purchase, it's two pennies. our schools are at risk. we have been cutting classes. we are raising tuition. we have been shortening the school year. i'm telli
you some money. my job is not just to entertain you, fwou educate -- but to educate you, so call me. china. china. the people's republic is more important than we are. that's my conclusion after today's session where the averages rocked a bit higher. the dow gaining 136 points. the nasdaq growing 1.44%. i never want to sell the united states short, ever. hurricane sandy could impact the entire nation as federal money and private insurance starts paying off and construction comes back with a vengeance. auto and home industries are coming back with more confidence than ever. and there is real hope in the air that tomorrow's big employment report might show some nice gains. the jobs report were a tad better than expects. that said, the upward move we saw in many stocks today, particularly in the industrials cannot be traced to anything happening here. no, not at all. these gains were all about one piece of data out of china. and not anything else you heard about why the stocks moved is wrong. we got the boost of stocks from fedex and the freight transporter into a mining and equipment
think we can do some pretty radical things in education and training. you know, i don't see why education should be -- should cost -- why higher education should cost any american more than a nominal amount. i think that we can give tuition-free scholarships to everyone who attends public schools, public universities. and we have great public universities in america. and it would be a matter of rechanneling the student aid we now provide into this. and it would take it away from the private universities. i am saying look i'm a product of private universities but as a matter of public policy the distribution of money between the private and public sector in education i think is a matter of indifference. what matters is people's access to college education and tuition should not be a barrier. i also think that we could and we've been proposing this in various forms for 15 years, since the mid 90s -- that's 15 years -- use the community college system as a means of providing any american free access to it skills. open up the computer labs, staff them. anybody who walks in can get t
, toll bridges. >> reporter: public school education by law is guaranteed 48% of the state's general fund, whereas corrections gets about 7%. on average, the state and federal government allocate almost 9,000 per pupil in california, less than half of what the state of new york spends on its students. but getting more money for schools often means asking local voters to increase their own taxes. for example, the city of berkeley raises more than $3,000 per pupil in extra funds. other school districts have had similar success in the bay area, schools in poorer districts, though, don't have parents who can afford that. >> affluent communities are counting on taxes. affluent communities are passing local bonds to improve the quality of their school facilities. but these are not options available to a lot of middle class and blue collar communities. >> reporter: where budgets are tight and dollars are short, consider this. nearly 50% of inmates nationwide are high school dropouts. in san francisco, dana king, cbs 5. >>> last year, the state cut funding for prisons by more than $4 billion. the
years: making education and training a national priority; building on our manufacturing boom; boosting american-made energy; reducing the deficits responsibly by cutting where... we can, and asking the wealthy to pay a little more. and ending the war in afghanistan, so we can... do some nation-building here at home. that's the right path. so read my plan, compare it to governor romney's... and decide which is better for you. it's an honor to be your president... and i'm asking for your vote... so together, we can keep moving america forward. i'm barack obama and i approve this message. . >>> the ad war heated up again today. the obama and romney campaigns launched new attack ads against each other. this year, television is not the only battlefront. tom fitzgerald is back with more. tom. >> reporter: brian, we have moved on in this campaign this year to all different forms of advertising and social networks, on the radio. the both campaigns put the brakes for a few days against direct attacks on each other in the aftermath of hurricane sandy. the spin machines, make no mistake, are back
the students with this type of education. if that's the case, fred, this program is going to be discontinued ands the federal court will take it and there is -- >> it's not going to happen. >> there is a viable claim if that's the case. i don't know what's going on in the classrooms. >> nothing. nothing. not going to happen. >> there is a statement coming from the union school district in ense nita, tim barrett saying this -- it's as if he was listening to you. >> that's the point. >> even if they don't say nam ma stay or not using some of the trigger words that really are talking about the poses, at least that's the interpretation of a lot of yogis that it's -- >> that's right. >> it's communicating what the poses are, not necessarily, you know, the hindu religion. are you saying on those grounds it would be okay then? >> if they strip away that and if that's an accurate statement which we heard, then the exercise will continue and there is no lawsuit. i agree on that point. >> it's based -- >> the allegation is -- it's a little more than nam ma stay. it's a little more than that. >> okay.
to the realization that we are dealing with education regurgitation. because you said trust in government through natural disaster. could we trust so-called government in getting in to illegal unfunded wars or trust the government dealing with hiding fascist trade agreements or $4 for a gallon of gas? so, no, we can't trust the government. but the problem is the question. because the government is the people. if you go to the constitution, it is a government for the people by the people. and if you look at the election process that is going on today with unlimited campaign financing, you cannot get further from one citizen and one vote, a government for the people by the people. so i can turn on c-span or g.e. or fox or time warner or disney or i can tune in to clear channel or any old fox radio, "wall street journal," and you are just bombarded 24 hours a day seven days a week with -- even the question that you are asking on the screen is an insane thought that somehow these politicianless and billionaires equal government.e billionaires equal government.s billionaires equal government. billiona
to entertain you, fwou educate y-- but to educate you, so call me. new york city mayor mike bloomberg ran that sweet chime this morning, the opening bell to the new york stock exchange and suddenly wall street was back in business. and even though not all the markets implied -- nasdaq down. you could feel the blood flowing through the veins of the stock market after two days where its heart was stilled. it wasn't just wall street that opened for business today, though. the main street that runs clear across this country may now be open for a new kind of business. one that's pretty darned moribund for years. the business of construction. yes, mother nature dealt a vicious blow and our hearts to go out to families who lost loved ones. but in spite of the tragedy, in our own curious way, sandy has given us the opportunity for a boost since the government rebuilt southern florida after hurricane andrew in 1992. a reconstruction so huge, it moved the country's entire gdp needle just when we needed it, after right a nasty recession. and now that we've assessed the damage, or we're trying to at
has to appeal to the swing areas. more independent voters. and you had this educated, affluent group, the base around ohio state university. and that has been critical. in the end, if you show that map, ohio is broken up, we have said it for years into 5 ohios. those five areas, plus some of the border areas, we have about seven media markets. it makes a very expensive to campaign here. in gubernatorial races and some presidential races there will go to west virginia to reach the southern ohio parts. that is where the bigger market is and that has to be part of the mix, too. ohio is five ohios. host: we talked about the issues, the top issues in ohio in this election cycle -- can we talk about the issues? guest: this is like to been a shock to your viewers, but the auto issue has been huge here. i have never seen where one issue in the campaign can play so well here. obviously, it is the battle of the bailout. who wanted to take it into bankruptcy. who got hurt, who did not. you are seeing the new ones being played on. and you are seeing the big swing, which is on the president's sid
vote idea. here is a way of spending -- let's get rid of elections and get rid of having educated citizens who are educated every two and four years. wouldn't it be easier if we had no money in politics, no elections, no vote counting. >> wait a second. the point here is actually -- i know -- i'm saying if we are worried about the expensive campaigns, i think running the popular vote election is more expensive. >> we have to do more than reforms as well. it's why the people who are push thg are saying yes, we need money out and people in. we need a full democracy. it's one part of it. i don't think it's sufficient. >> how is making every vote count going to cause more money to be raised? >> hold that thought. you can think about this. you can't think about the way it will impact the policy positions the candidates take. i think that might be interesting. we'll be back with more after this. that can only come from having someone else pay your mortgage for an entire year... this is what you'll experience if you win the quicken loans skip-a-year mortgage sweepstakes. up to five winne
hard to do. that's, you know, we would -- . >> it used to be. the education system in many respects encouraged that. you would go and get a postgraduate degree to work out how to make something an mba, maybe. you don't need anymore. the way of -- the tools are there for you to engage automatically. now, you just need to plug them together. there are these stories that are emerging that are allow you to wrap around the existing system. they don't support us. and they haven't supported these sorts of entrepreneurs but our tools do. that's the really vital thing. >> i think the best thing michigan can do or the city of detroit is literally a marketing campaign like knick key, you can do. everybody has ideas. and, i mean, i was in berlin, actually, there's a panel in berlin v detroit which is interesting. you can feel the energy building. there's a come plaintiff's exhibit over there of germans v the u.s. they feel like we are faster and innovative. what you're starting to sense is build the confidence they can do it as well. we're seeing more entrepreneurship come out of here. i feel t
but covering narrative's. rather than just putting one person on education to try to gobble that entire fire hose that comes at them, they can add narratives and subtract them, make sure people are involved. if they are not enrolled in those narratives, something will play out without their impact. >> a follow-up question -- i am not thinking of any city in particular here. with that kind of operation, let's say you have that operation in a city where the daily newspaper in town started to do some very strange things. i imagine that. it was owned by somebody who was very openly talking they were going to support particular causes, particular developments, particular parties. i imagine something like that could happen. does that add to the obligation of citizens, people like you, to do more to fill that void? or can you still fill the void -- is that city just out of luck? >> first of all, it is a remarkable symbol of what is happening to journalism. locally, the owners of the "union tribune" just purchased the "north county times" -- the assets are collapsing in value. they bought it for $12
the race to the top is not a good policy for education for one candidate. we have been working with the administration to try to get them more aware of the issues that are out there. it is critically important every time america against -- gets left off. other countries have a carbon tax. we do not, and that is the problem. there has been debate. it has been thrown against the wall. let's hope it sticks. let's talk about what we have done, less than in decades. we are becoming more energy dependent. natural gas is cheaper than cool. that is good for folks. energy is sheet. that is good for the consumers. the obama administration needs more from rural america. it is an educational paul -- process, and let's put it like that. >> we do not have an energy policy. we have an environmental policy. we need to work on alternatives like wind and solar and biomass. we need to talk about conservation, and we need to reach our next generation of energy production. the president does not have an energy policy. >> it is time to take our first break. you are watching the 2012 montana debate.
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